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Video: BAL@PHI: Knapp ropes an RBI triple down the line

SOUND SMART Rhys Hoskins doubled to score two runs in the third inning to give the Phillies a 2-1 lead. Hoskins reached 100 career RBIs in his 124th career game. Elias Sports Bureau said it is the fewest games played from the beginning of a Major League career with the Phillies to reach 100 RBIs. Chuck Klein held the previous mark. He needed 143 games to reach 100 RBIs in 1929.

Hoskins also reached 100 career RBIs in the ninth-fewest games in MLB history. Since 1951, only Ryan Braun (118 games in 2008) and Hoskins have reached 100 career RBIs in 124 or fewer games.

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YOU GOTTA SEE THIS Franco saved the game with the bases loaded and two outs in the eighth inning, when he made a diving catch to his right on a ground ball from Davis. Franco, whose cap partially covered his eyes, threw from his knees to first baseman Carlos Santana to end the inning. The Orioles reviewed Franco's play, thinking Santana's foot might have been pulled off the bag. But the play stood as called.

"I don't know how I made that play," Franco said. "I just don't know. I just know I got it, and I tried to make a good throw."

Video: BAL@PHI: Franco talks diving stop in 8th to save run

HE SAID IT "I don't think about it. Just come in every single day and do everything I can do. Try to live day to day and not think about what's going to happen. Try to just be in my moment and after that whatever happens happens." -- Franco, on "We want Manny!" chants from Phillies fans. While the Phillies are unlikely to land Manny Machado before July 31, they are expected to make a push for a third baseman.

UP NEXT Phillies right-hander Aaron Nola (10-2, 2.48 ERA) faces the Orioles on Wednesday in the second game of a two-game series at Citizens Bank Park. Nola almost certainly will learn next week that he has made the National League All-Star team. Orioles right-hander Yefry Ramirez (0-1, 2.89) starts for Baltimore. First pitch is at 4:05 p.m. ET.

Todd Zolecki has covered the Phillies since 2003, and for MLB.com since 2009. Follow him on Twitter , Instagram and Facebook .

Read more: Philadelphia Phillies, Zach Eflin, Maikel Franco, Rhys Hoskins, Andrew Knapp
Johnson notches first MLB hit, tosses 4 2/3 innings vs. Washington
By Ian Browne MLB.com @IanMBrowne
Jul. 3rd, 2018

WASHINGTON -- It was a little less than a year ago that the Red Sox picked up Novica Reversible crocheted pendant necklace Floral Downpour BdlqxyPve
for the stretch run, and his bat gave them a considerable spark. Perhaps that Nunez is ready to re-emerge.

It sure looked like it on Tuesday night at Nationals Park, as the right-handed hitter helped spark his team to an 11-4 rout of the Nationals with an early three-run rocket.

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Nunez tore into Tanner Roark 's 90.7-mph fastball in the top of the second and smashed it over the Nats' bullpen in left-center. Nunez's sixth homer of the season snapped a scoreless tie. For the season, Nunez is slashing .254/.286/.371 with 14 doubles and 22 RBIs in 272 at-bats.

Example of perceptual disregard in the cinema. Hochberg () discusses the view of objects moving in front of a landscape. In normal film viewing flatness of studio-backgrounds and quasi-camera movement is disregarded. Traditional films can use a painted or projected landscape at the backdrop of the set, and panning camera movements instead of a really mobile camera to create a convincing impression in the viewer of following a moving object in the scene’s space. A cycling woman is followed in a pan shot moving from left to right; frames A and B constitute the beginning and the end of the panning shot. In normal perception in the real-world objects on the horizon seem to move in the direction of the moving subject, whereas nearby objects move in opposite direction. Panning involves a stationary viewpoint, causing the image to lack this 'motion parallax'. For example, the scarecrow in the middle ground of frame B should be further to the left from the ridge on the horizon than in frame A (DA < DB), but the distance between the objects has remained identical (DA = DB). However, the lack of parallax and resulting apparent flatness can be and is disregarded and viewers experience smooth self-motion parallel to the moving object. Disregard such a this is part and parcel of normal film viewing or the "ecology of the cinema".

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The most immediate demonstration of apparent motion is Duncker’s induced motion referred to above, a cinematic effect because it is dependent on canonical projection within a frame. The best analytic examples are about the perception of events in filmed dance. Footnote 27 For Hochberg and Brooks an ecological approach to perception in the cinema needs to take the ecology of the cinema into account.

The necessity of cognitive schemas in film perception was pointed out most pregnantly in Hochberg’s dealing with the comprehension of shot transitions or cuts. It was argued that known sensory integration and Gibson’s extraction of invariants, fail to account for viewers’ comprehension of frequent and simple cinematic events like elision of space and time. Overlap in contents between successive shots can be hard to identify or lack at all. Hochberg and Brooks proposed a principled alternative: films play in the mind’s eye. Viewers construct an off-screen mental space from separate views, and they can link two successive views by the relation of each of these to this space. In constructing a mental space, overlap may even be overruled by other cues, that have nothing to do with any invariance. The construction must involve event schemas and cognitive principles removed from anything immediately given in the film. Schemas may indeed outperform (mathematical) invariants picked up from the optical array offered by the screen. Hochberg and Brooks ( 1996b ) show, for example how gaze direction of film characters or personae in subsequent shots may be more effective in the construction of a continuous mental scene than overlapping spatial or visual symbolic contents. Fine Jewelry 1 CT TW Diamond Sterling Silver Ring BWxsKv
Mental schemas seem to be indispensable in the comprehension of sequences of completely non-overlapping cuts. A famous demonstration by Hochberg and Brooks is reproduced in Fig. . The succession of shots is readily understood when it is preceded by the presentation of a cross, which provides the integrating schema. Viewers’ schema-based continuous perception of scenes is supported by the ways that traditional cinema tells its stories. The presentation of an overall view in so-called 'establishing shots' followed by a 'break-down' of its object into subsequently presented part views is a cornerstone procedure in classical continuity film style (Bordwell and Thompson, /1979).

And when Jordan amassed his third pass defensed on Sunday, Rankins said Jordan came to the sideline and repeatedly said "triple-double."

"You know Cam, full of charisma, and if he's making plays, he's going to let you know," Rankins said.

Rankins said Jordan is as good of a "pure defensive end" as he has ever seen. The only other name that came to mind was Julius Peppers. Because of Jordan's ability to cause disruption in the run and pass game, it's hard to argue with any praise, no matter how lofty.

"He's as good as it gets," Rankins said.

7 things we learned from the New Orleans Saints' win vs. the New York Jets

N.O. gets to 10-4, but several problem area remain

Updated ; Posted
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By Larry Holder

LHolder@NOLA.com

NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

We're ranking the New Orleans Saints ' top players for the seventh consecutive offseason. We'll publish a new player each weekday as we inch closer to training camp.

Seven players from last year's list no longer reside on the team's roster: No. 7 Kenny Vaccaro, No. 9 Willie Snead, No. 10 Zach Strief, No. 11 Adrian Peterson, No. 13 Nick Fairley, No. 14 Delvin Breaux, No. 15 Dannell Ellerbe. And a handful from last year's list didn't make the 2018 version.

That's actually a positive for the Saints.

It's the first time in a few years where I struggled to cut down the list to 20 viable candidates. As opposed to the last couple of offseasons where I nearly couldn't find enough capable players to field a top 20 list.

Predicting Nos. 1 and 2 on the 2018 version should be no brainers. The rest of the list should make for a healthy debate:

No. 13 Sheldon Rankins

Last year's rank: 12

Last year's rank:

Fan composite ranking: 12

Fan composite ranking:

Season: 3; Age: 24; Height: 6-2; Weight: 305

Season: Height: Weight:

The team's 2016 first-round pick displayed plenty of promise only playing nine games his rookie season. Rankins left the 2017 season not totally thrilled with his sophomore season, but he certainly helped others shine as a regular starter.

Rankins started every game for the Saints in 2017 after a knee injury sidelined him for nearly half of 2016. He also played 812 defensive snaps, ranking 13th in the league among defensive linemen.

Rankins' 2017 statistics stagnated, though.

He tallied four sacks and 20 total tackles his first season, but only two sacks and 26 total tackles in 2017. His most memorable play occurred when he intercepted a pass off Tyrod Taylor and nearly scored a touchdown in the Saints' romp at Buffalo on Nov. 12.

A good tool for remembering your responses is to put them into a story form that you can tell in the interview. No need to memorize responses (in fact, it’s best not to), but do develop talking points. There are excellent tools available to help you with interview questions and responses. Also, consider using the Novica Sterling silver heart ring Love Unites 7rmFnuPmxp
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Plan out a wardrobe that fits the organization and its culture, striving for the most professional appearance you can accomplish. Remember that it’s always better to be overdressed than under” and to wear clothing that fits and is clean and pressed. Keep accessories and jewelry to a minimum. Try not to smoke or eat right before the interview” and if possible, brush your teeth or use mouthwash.

There is no excuse ever for arriving late to an interview. Short of a disaster, strive to arrive about 15 minutes before your scheduled interview to complete additional paperwork and allow yourself time to get settled. Arriving a bit early is also a chance to observe the dynamics of the workplace.

The day before the interview, pack up extra copies of your resume or CV and reference list. If you have a portfolio or samples of your work, bring those along too. Finally, remember to pack several pens and a pad of paper to jot notes. Finally, as you get to the offices, shut off your cell phone. (And if you were chewing gum, get rid of it.)

A cardinal rule of interviewing is to be polite and offer warm greetings to everyone you meet” from the parking attendant to the receptionist to the hiring manager. Employers often are curious how job applicants treat staff members” and your job offer could easily be derailed if you’re rude or arrogant to any of the staff. When it’s time for the interview, keep in mind that first impressions” the impression interviewers get in the first few seconds of meeting you” can make or break an interview.

Make a strong first impression by dressing well (see #3), arriving early (see #4), and when greeting your interviewer, stand, smile, make eye contact, and offer a firm“ but not bone-crushing“ handshake.

Remember that having a positive attitude and expressing enthusiasm for the job and employer are vital in the initial stages of the interview; studies show that hiring managers make critical decisions about job applicants in the first 20 minutes of the interview.

Once the interview starts, the key to success is the quality and delivery of your responses. Your goal should always be authenticity, responding truthfully to interview questions. At the same time, your goal is to get to the next step, so you’ll want to provide focused responses that showcase your skills, experience, and fit” with the job and the employer. Provide solid examples of solutions and accomplishments” but keep your responses short and to the point.

By preparing responses to common interview questions (see #2), you’ll ideally avoid long, rambling responses that bore interviewers. Always attempt to keep your interview responses short and to the point. Finally, no matter how much an interviewer might bait you, never badmouth a previous employer, boss, or co-worker. The interview is about you” and making your case that you are the ideal candidate for the job.

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